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Not long ago, I was on a crowded interstate in which most of the drivers were trying to drive right around the posted speed limit of 70 miles per hour. Several others were driving in the fast lane at speeds approaching 80 mph.

I'm ashamed to admit that I was a part of the latter group. My conscience bothered me a little bit when I was driving almost 80, but it bothered me a lot if I considered going any faster. I simply couldn't bring myself to do it. But a few other people could.

Even though all of the vehicles were moving along efficiently and safely (and at a fast pace, I might add), there were a few individuals who just couldn't appreciate an adequate traffic flow.

I mean, picture the scene. The right lane was full of 70 mph drivers. The left lane had scores of people going 78-80. And, on occasion, a heavy-footed soul would bear down on all of us, mad as a hornet because people going 80 were in his way.

Now please understand that, as I mentioned, I felt a tad bit guilty driving almost 80. But if I slowed to 75, I noticed that I was more of a hindrance, so I was trying to stay within the natural flow of the left lane.

With both lanes full of people going 70-80 mph, there really wasn't a place for someone who wanted to drive 90 or more. But there were a few impatient souls who forced the issue anyway.

And, to be honest, I found it troubling. I mean, every person going 70 was abiding by the law. Those of us who were driving close to 80 -- I hate to say it -- were breaking the law. And because 80 mph is breaking the law quite enough, I had no sympathy for the few who wanted to break it even more by going 90 or more.

The way I look at it, if I am already going 10 miles over the speed limit, I don't feel in any way obligated to move over so that someone who is a NASCAR driver at heart can blow on by.

I understand that we all have places to be. And I also understand that any one of us can be running behind schedule. But if a person just has to drive 90 or 95 everywhere he goes, I really don't think that the rest of us have to clear the roads to accommodate his desire for high speeds. Not unless that someone is flashing blue or red lights.

But to put everything in a positive light, let's wrap this up in the same way I finished my recent trip. I prayed for those who were driving 90 mph or more, and I still do. They need it, for their physical safety if nothing else. But they also need it if they drive that fast simply by being impatient.

Impatience is hard on a person. If it gets you in its grip, and you keep revving your emotional engine, you might strip an emotional gear.

Drivers who go 90 also need prayerful support if they abide by all other laws in the same way that they abide by the speed limit. A person like that is bound to run into governmental authority sooner or later. We could all pray that common sense will reign in a person's mind before that happens.

And finally, I'm praying for high-speed drivers because of the good it does for me. The plain truth is, I need to be in the right frame of mind myself.

The highways can be dangerous, but the road of life can be even more treacherous. It is best to be a praying soul when you travel on either.

• • •

David Wilson, Ed.D., of Springdale, is a writer and teacher at heart. His book, Learning Every Day, includes several of his columns and is now available on Amazon, iTunes, and Barnes and Noble. You may email him at dwnotes@hotmail.com. Opinions expressed are those of the author.

Editorial on 01/10/2018

Print Headline: Speeding down the highways

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